Sleep Awareness Week

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What is Sleep Awareness Week?

Celebrated this year from March 13-19, 2022, Sleep Awareness Week is NSF’s (National Sleep Foundation) public education campaign that seeks to celebrate sleep health and encourages the public to improve and prioritize healthy sleep health and overall well-being. The campaign intentionally coincides with the beginning of Daylight Saving Time, when Americans change their clocks and lose an hour of time (and of sleep). 

Sleep Awareness Week launched in 1998. Since then, the National Sleep Foundation has used the campaign to provide the public with valuable information about the numerous benefits associated with optimal sleep. After all, not only does sleep affect health, but it also affects well-being and safety. On the contrary, receiving less than six hours of sleep per night can have serious health consequences and implications. Because of this, sleep should be recognized as an essential component of overall wellness. 

At Owlet, we recognize the importance of sleep. Statistics show that new parents will lose an average of 44 days of sleep during their first year of parenthood. Although some sleep loss and disruption is an inevitable part of having a newborn, we aim to create products and technology that help create healthy sleep habits from day one. Because when Baby sleeps better, the entire family sleeps better.

6 Benefits of Sleep

  1. Sleep Boosts Your Immune System. When your body gets enough sleep, your immune cells and proteins are adequately rested so that they can fight any infections or diseases that come their way, such as the cold or the flu. On the flip side, you’re more prone to a weakened immune system if you don’t get proper sleep.
  2. Sleep Puts you in a Better Mood. This explanation isn’t quite as scientific: if you sleep well, you’ll wake up feeling rested and will therefore have a more positive outlook. You’ll also have increased energy levels when you get a good night’s sleep, which will do wonders for your mood.
  3. Sleep Prevents Weight Gain. Although sleeping in and of itself won’t help you shed extra weight, it will help you from unnecessary weight gain. When you’re sleep deprived, your body produces ghrelin, a hormone that naturally increases your appetite. At the same time, your body will also decrease the production of leptin, a hormone that alerts you when you’re full. That combination is a recipe for weight gain.
  4. Sleep Strengthens Your Heart. Sleep deprivation puts you at a greater risk for high blood pressure and heart attacks due to an increased production of cortisol, a stress hormone that makes your heart naturally work harder. Getting enough sleep will help your heart rest.
  5. Sleep Can Increase Productivity. Although some people love to pull all-nighters to get work done, putting off a night of sleep could actually do more harm than good. A lack of sleep means a lack in overall concentration and cognitive function. On the other hand, getting adequate sleep will increase concentration and cognitive function, which in turn increases your productivity.
  6. Sleep Provides Safety. According to AAA, you’re twice as likely to get in a motor accident when you’ve received 6-7 hours of sleep as opposed to a full 8 hours of sleep. And, if you happen to sleep less than 5 hours, your chances of getting in a crash quadruple. This is due to the fact that your reaction time slows down when you’re sleep deprived and your brain isn’t fully rested.
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Madelyn Harris

Hailing from Southern California, copywriter Madelyn Harris has lived and worked in a number of domestic and international locations. Her favorite spots include Hoi An, Vietnam and Napier, New Zealand. She’s a big fan of Jeopardy, hot yoga, and the Oxford comma.



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